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October 2, 2011 / carlispina

QRpedia – Delivering Content in Multiple Languages

An example of a QR code made using QRpedia

Earlier this week, Wikipedia introduced an interesting new QR code generator called QRpedia, which can be used to generate QR codes for Wikipedia entries. The unique feature of the QR codes generated with QRpedia is that they automatically detect the preferred language of the device used to scan the QR code and direct the user to the Wikipedia entry in that language. If no entry exists in the preferred language, the user is instead directed to the results of a search for the topic in the preferred language.

This technology is perfect for museums since it makes it possible to direct visitors to information in their preferred language with ease and several museums are already taking advantage of QRpedia for this very reason including The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, Derby Museum and Art Gallery and The National Archives of the UK. Libraries could also make use of this technology, either in their exhibitions or to provide more information, in more languages, on signs identifying various subjects or authors found on the shelves of the library. This technology is exciting because it will help museums and libraries to include patrons for whom English is not their first language. While linking to Wikipedia can always be a cause for concern since it is hard to guarantee the accuracy of all of the information found in the entries, this is a great first step towards directing visitors to additional information in their native language.

Check out this video to see an example of QRpedia in action at the British Museum:

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